Patrick Mahomes of the Kansas City Chiefs speaks to the media during the Kansas City Chiefs media availability prior to Super Bowl LIV 
Patrick Mahomes of the Kansas City Chiefs speaks to the media during the Kansas City Chiefs media availability prior to Super Bowl LIV   Mark Brown/Getty Images

The Kansas City Chiefs and San Francisco 49ers will meet in Super Bowl LIV, which will be televised live in more than 180 countries and territories and will be broadcast live in almost 25 languages.

Kansas City, the AFC champion with its high-speed offensive attack, is a slight favorite. The Chiefs are in their first Super Bowl in 50 years, with their lone title coming in Super Bowl IV.

Chiefs quarterback Patrick Mahomes, last year’s league MVP, is looking to join Ben Roethlisberger and Tom Brady as the only quarterbacks to hoist a Lombardi Trophy before their 25th birthday. At 24 years and 138 days old on Sunday, Mahomes is the fifth-youngest quarterback to start in the Super Bowl.

Should Kansas City win, Mahomes will become the youngest player to win both an NFL MVP award and a Super Bowl title, surpassing Pro Football Hall of Famer Emmitt Smith (24 years, 233 days old on the last day of his MVP 1993 season).

The 49ers have five Super Bowl titles, which ties them for third among NFL teams. They can tie the New England Patriots and Pittsburgh Steelers for the most.

Expectations were high for San Francisco in 2018, but quarterback Jimmy Garoppolo tore his ACL in the third game of the year as the 49ers limped to a 4-12 finish. Garoppolo went through an intense rehab and has thrived this season.

Garoppolo started all 16 regular-season games, completing 69.1% of his passes for 3,978 yards, 27 touchdowns, 13 interceptions, and a 102.0 passer rating — though notably in this postseason Garoppolo is just 17-27 for 208 yards with a touchdown and interception in two games.

Instead, their offensive production has come on the ground. Raheem Mostert rushed for 220 yards in the NFC championship game, the second-highest total in a postseason game, behind Pro Football Hall of Famer Eric Dickerson (248 yards for the Los Angeles Rams on January 4, 1986).